Tag Archives: top rope

Girth Hitch Insanity

Sling to sling to sling girth hitch insanity: a climbing anchor.

Sling to sling to sling girth hitch insanity: a climbing anchor.

Justin Rotherham took this shot at Smith Rock a few weeks back. A seemingly infinite chain of girth hitched webbing. We’ve discussed the whole girth hitching webbing thing in the past here and here. This one isn’t necessarily all that dangerous, for the simple reason that the girth hitched monstrosity is a ‘back up’ for a presumably more proper climbing anchor. But it definitely qualifies as Jive-Ass (in this case, of the ‘overkill’ variety).

In Justin’s words [emphasis is mine], “This sling to sling to sling girth hitch insanity was a back up to a 2 quickdraw top rope set up.  The sling ‘back up’ was attached to the anchor for the next route over with another non-locking biner.  The other end of the sling had a quicklink that they had threaded the rope through after clipping the draws.”

Yeah, some times people go a little overboard with their redundancy. Apparently two bolts (two bolts!) weren’t enough for top roping (top roping!). And thus jive-assery was required.

Parting words or wisdom from Justin: “These are bolted anchors people!  Quit trying to make it harder than it needs to be.”

Location: Smith Rock State Park, Oregon, USA

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Ouray Jive-Assery

Jive-Ass Top Rope Anchor in Ouray Ice Park

Jive-Ass Top Rope Anchor

Here is some ultra fresh Jive-Assery from the Ouray Ice Park, in Ouray Colorado (which never disappoints).*

 Jeremy Lubkin took this photo just days ago. It’s an ice climbing top rope anchor. It’s not exactly clear what’s going on here, but something’s not right. As Jeremy put it “So much cord I get confused, but pretty sure it qualifies as Jive Ass.”

If I had to venture a guess I’d say the green webbing is some kind of overhand on a bight with the tail clipped into the carabiners, backed up with some black webbing, looped into the power point, and tied with a water knot. Textbook jive-ass.

Very nice locking carabiner redundancy though. Opposite and almost even opposed (one is flipped to create the opposing gates–as Michael Zasadsian pointed out to me). If it weren’t true that an anchor is only as strong as its weakest link, this would almost make up for everything.

Location: Ouray Ice Park, Ouray, Colorado USA

*That’s not intended to disparage the climbers at the Ouray Ice Park. Some really talented and skilled climbers climb there. It’s just that the uniqueness of this ice climbing ‘crag’ affords many opportunities for witnessing jive-ass anchors. You have a mile of top rope anchors at the top of Uncompahgre Gorge, which you can walk past. Odds are in your favor that you’re going to encounter something jive-ass eventually.

The Opposite of Jive-Ass

Bomber natural pro climbing anchor

Bomber natural pro climbing anchor.

Lest you get the impression that all ice climbing anchors at the Ouray Ice Park in Colorado are jive-ass (they aren’t), here is a bomber climbing anchor. It’s quite aesthetically pleasing, actually–beautiful even–with its symmetrical bowlines with overhand back up knots. Personally I prefer to have the overhand back up knot right up against the bowline knot to keep everything from slipping, but this set up is gorgeous nonetheless. EARNEST and SERENE to a fault, it’s made of a single piece of what looks to be 7 mm cord. The power point was a “super 8”. I talked to the builder and he was very proud of his anchor. The pride he takes in his work shows.

Why are so many of my jive-ass anchor photos from the Ouray Ice Park? Or perhaps a better question is: how am I able to produce so many jive-ass anchor photos from the Ouray Ice Park? I think it’s simply a matter of sheer numbers and access. On a typical day there are dozens and dozens of top rope ice climbing anchors built in the park–many of them right next to one another. There are few places–rock climbing crags included–where a person can witness so many climbing anchor set ups in one place in one day. And given the sheer number, odds are that you’re going to encounter at least one or two anchors built by someone with inadequate (or no) climbing anchor construction training. All of that said, most of the climbing anchors one encounters there are perfectly bomber.

Location: Ouray Ice Park, Ouray, Colorado, USA